Daily Archives: December 16, 2005

The Impeach Bush Bandwagon

It’s begun, over here. Apparently, authorizing the NSA to spy on US citizens on US soil may not be entirely legal.

For the record: I think we need another impeachment process almost exactly as much as I need to strap a salmon to my scalp and headbutt a grizzly.

And oddly enough, I’m feeling a little sorry for our president. He was working up a nice head of approval steam this last week, taking responsibility for intelligence failures in Iraq and all that, and then all that gets tubed by this whole spying thing. The guy just can’t catch a break; other presidents may have had worse years in their administrations than Bush has had in 2005, but not many. The guy clearly needs a hug.

Mind you, I’m not feeling so sorry for the man that I think we need to let this whole domestic spying thing slip past us. Oh, my. Let’s not.

Son & Foe

sandfcover.jpg

Those of you who are itchin’ for new reading material of a mordant and/or quirky sort would be well-advised to check out Son and Foe, a new online magazine with an interesting distribution model: It posts material from its editions on its Web site, but not all at once — and it also offers a downloadble version, complete with multimedia goodies, for $3. I have the downloadable version, which I recommend over sucking down the free feed, because in addition to the fiction of the magazine, the short films and music that come in the multimedia packet are both good and curious: songs about massively decompressing planes and funny short films about high school gym riots (featuring elephants!) are highlights. It’s a veritable smorgasbord of offbeat tidbits, and I’ve been having fun sampling the buffet.

So check out the Son and Foe site, and if you like what you see, give thought to shelling out the three bucks for the whole package. It’s a queer bill well invested, I’d say.

Son & Foe

sandfcover.jpg

Those of you who are itchin’ for new reading material of a mordant and/or quirky sort would be well-advised to check out Son and Foe, a new online magazine with an interesting distribution model: It posts material from its editions on its Web site, but not all at once — and it also offers a downloadble version, complete with multimedia goodies, for $3. I have the downloadable version, which I recommend over sucking down the free feed, because in addition to the fiction of the magazine, the short films and music that come in the multimedia packet are both good and curious: songs about massively decompressing planes and funny short films about high school gym riots (featuring elephants!) are highlights. It’s a veritable smorgasbord of offbeat tidbits, and I’ve been having fun sampling the buffet.

So check out the Son and Foe site, and if you like what you see, give thought to shelling out the three bucks for the whole package. It’s a queer bill well invested, I’d say.

Outreach in Action: Gateway Science Fiction

Having bloviated yesterday that current science fiction offers few “open doors” for non-Science Fiction readers to check out the genre, I want to offer interested parties an opportunity to prove me wrong, or at the very least, prove that I’ve wildly overstated the issue. So, consider this your opportunity to suggest Gateway Science Fiction — Good, recent science fiction for people who don’t read science fiction.

Here are the conditions I’m setting upon recommendations:

1. Assume your audience is a reasonably literate human adult (25+) who is unstupid and technologically competent (i.e., can use a computer, cell phone and iPod), but whose literary SF experience is limited to whatever SF they may have been assigned in high school and college.

2. While I love Young Adult books, focus on SF marketed to adults.

3. No books before 1995.

4. Book has to be primarily SF. A few fantasy elements are fine, but if you’re an SF/F geek, you probably have a good idea where the line is. If not, see here for a decent arbitrary dividing line between SF and fantasy.

5. Recommend a book that you would actually recommend to someone; which is to say, don’t recommend a book just because its geek form factor is low enough that a mundane reader can follow the tech. A book that has a low technological barrier of entry but which has a lousy story is not going to be a good book to recommend to anyone.

6. Refrain from buttering up the host by recommending one of his books. I mean, thanks and all, but no. Also, refrain from recommending your books, even if they’re perfect gateway SF. Let’s share the love here, not bogart the gateway goodness.

There are the ground rules. Now: What have you got?