Daily Archives: January 2, 2007

Mike Ford Auction; TAD Speaks!

Two late-breaking bits for you on this second day of January:

Deb Geisler alerts me to a Mike Ford Memorial Auction & Extravaganza which will be held on the Friday night of Boskone, in February. The auction in his memory will go to benefit the John M. Ford Memorial Book Endowment, which benefits the Minneapolis Public Library.

At the moment, NESFA (the folks who run Boskone) are soliciting items for the auction, so if you’re an author or a fan with something interesting to contribute to the cause of literacy, click that auction link above and let NESFA know. I’ll be pitching in a couple of items for auction myself. Don’t let me be the only one.

On a somewhat more silly note, YouTube sent me an e-mail today alerting me that there had been a “video response” to my video of the mass-market paperback version of Old Man’s War assaulting the trade paperback version. What was the response and from whom? Well, perhaps you’d best see it for yourself:

Heh heh heh. For the record, the trade paperback survived. Sure, his spine was cracked. But isn’t that the fate of paperbacks anyway?

Start Spreading the News, etc.

Those of you getting used to the whole “look, Scalzi’s updating 48,000 a day” thing, prepare for disappointment; tomorrow through Sunday I’m traveling and will update somewhat less frequently, and then once I get back I have to, you know, start making money again. So things will probably get back to their normal “update a couple of times a day” thing. Bear in mind every time I say something like that I end up ignoring it, but even so. This time it may stick.

Where am I traveling? To New York City, because, after all, who doesn’t like New York in January? I’m there to do some business, and also, maybe, see people. I say “maybe” because, like the unorganized schmuck I am, I’ve told basically no one I’m coming. So, uh: Hello, New York friends and colleagues. I’m coming to town. It’d be nice to see some of you. If you’d like to try to coordinate something, send me an e-mail and I’ll try to get my crap together. Otherwise, well, I understand New York might have a museum or two I can check out, and a few things that will stay open after 8pm.

TAD Bookgasm Review & Explorations Top 10 List

Last week, the lit site Bookgasm listed The Android’s Dream as one of their top five science fiction books of 2006; now they’ve posted the actual review of the book. Unsurprisingly, given the previous accolade, it’s a pretty nice review:

John Scalzi has created a book that’s as thrilling as Robert Ludlum in his prime, with a gentle wit and biting sarcastic tinge that makes the entire book a joy to read.

Groovy. TAD also makes another 2006 science fiction “Best Of” list, this one from Barnes & Noble’s Explorations site (their place to promote science fiction and fantasy). Also on the list are Infoquake, from David Louis Edelman, who is looking like a serious potential Campbell nominee at this point, and Shriek: An Afterword by Jeff VanderMeer. Excellent.

Update, 4:08pm — Oh, and it appears The Ghost Brigades has made SF Signal’s “Best of 2006″ list. w00t!

Yes, it seems to be self-promotingish sort of day here on Whatever. Some days it’s gonna be like that.

TAD Bookgasm Review & Explorations Top 10 List

Last week, the lit site Bookgasm listed The Android’s Dream as one of their top five science fiction books of 2006; now they’ve posted the actual review of the book. Unsurprisingly, given the previous accolade, it’s a pretty nice review:

John Scalzi has created a book that’s as thrilling as Robert Ludlum in his prime, with a gentle wit and biting sarcastic tinge that makes the entire book a joy to read.

Groovy. TAD also makes another 2006 science fiction “Best Of” list, this one from Barnes & Noble’s Explorations site (their place to promote science fiction and fantasy). Also on the list are Infoquake, from David Louis Edelman, who is looking like a serious potential Campbell nominee at this point, and Shriek: An Afterword by Jeff VanderMeer. Excellent.

Update, 4:08pm — Oh, and it appears The Ghost Brigades has made SF Signal’s “Best of 2006″ list. w00t!

Yes, it seems to be self-promotingish sort of day here on Whatever. Some days it’s gonna be like that.

TAD Bookgasm Review & Explorations Top 10 List

Last week, the lit site Bookgasm listed The Android’s Dream as one of their top five science fiction books of 2006; now they’ve posted the actual review of the book. Unsurprisingly, given the previous accolade, it’s a pretty nice review:

John Scalzi has created a book that’s as thrilling as Robert Ludlum in his prime, with a gentle wit and biting sarcastic tinge that makes the entire book a joy to read.

Groovy. TAD also makes another 2006 science fiction “Best Of” list, this one from Barnes & Noble’s Explorations site (their place to promote science fiction and fantasy). Also on the list are Infoquake, from David Louis Edelman, who is looking like a serious potential Campbell nominee at this point, and Shriek: An Afterword by Jeff VanderMeer. Excellent.

Update, 4:08pm — Oh, and it appears The Ghost Brigades has made SF Signal’s “Best of 2006″ list. w00t!

Yes, it seems to be self-promotingish sort of day here on Whatever. Some days it’s gonna be like that.

When Science Fiction Meets Its Own Future

Look, it’s the trade paperback version of Old Man’s War! What nutty adventure will it have today?

Which is say, today is officially the day the mass market paperback edition of Old Man’s War is out. Look for it in your local airport bookstore and supermarket! Or get it online. You can still get the trade paperback edition if you want it but I would assume they’re not printing any more, so if you want that version, get to it.

For those of you who for some insane reason want to put this video on your own site, it’s here. Remember also that this video will also be eligible for the Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form) in 2008. Hey, if a three-minute bit of Gollum flipping off people at the MTV Movie Awards can win, surely this merits a nomination. I mean, look at the pathos of the trade paperback edition! How can you not weep at it?

The 2007 Award Pimpage Post

I did one of these entries last year and I think it was useful to folks, so I’ll do it again this year.

Should you be considering me for one of your Hugo nominations for this year, or for other genre award nominations, here’s what work of mine is eligible for nomination this year:

Best Novel: The Ghost Brigades (Feb. 21, 06)
Best Novel: The Android’s Dream (Oct. 31, 06)

If you’re a Hugo voter, that’s pretty much all you need to know to nominate the works. If you’re a SFWA member and you want to nominate either work for a Nebula, then you need to make your nomination within one year of the book’s publication (2/21/07 for TGB, 10/31/07 for TAD). This is an artifact of SFWA’s “rolling eligibility” process for the Nebulas, which I’m really not a fan of, but there’s not much to be done about it at the moment. Inasmuch as I find the chance of me being nominated for a Nebula to be rather impressively small, this is largely academic, but of course I’d be happy to be surprised.

To address the question before it’s asked: On the very small chance someone wanted to nominate me for the Best Editor (short form) Hugo this year for guest-editing Subterranean Magazine #4, I’m afraid I’m not eligible — you have to edit more than a single issue of something to be eligible. I’m totally good with this; I think the possibility of me being nominated for an Editor Hugo is a little bit silly.

Regarding the Novel Hugos, I was basically flabbergasted to be nominated last year, and I would be delighted and equally flabbergasted to be nominated this year. So if you are thinking of nominating either of these books (or both! Both!), bless you. However, to be entirely honest with you, I have absolutely no idea if either The Ghost Brigades or The Android’s Dream is a strong contender this year. Indeed, I have absolutely no idea as to which novels at all are legitimately in the running for the Hugo, and I rather deeply suspect neither does anyone else.

Why? Because this year the Worldcon is in Japan, and that means a significant (and possibly majority) percentage of the nominators this year are Japanese. I doubt many of us in the Western hemisphere have any clue as to how these folks will vote or whether they’ve heard of many of the books in the US/UK which are eligible for consideration. Also, unless I’m reading the Hugo rules incorrectly, there’s no reason why Japanese-language novels could not be nominated, if they were published in 2006. So, I suspect it is equally true that there are any number of Japanese science fiction novels which are eligible for the Hugo that we in the US/UK know nothing about.

When the Hugo nominees are tallied up this year, I expect there will be some Japanese novels on the list; moreover, there ought to be; what’s the point of having the Hugos in Japan otherwise? The idea of Japanese-language Best Novel Hugo nominees is pretty exciting stuff — I’m not aware of any foreign-language novel being nominated for a Hugo, ever, so we’re well overdue — but on a purely practical level for English language SF writers it means that none of us really have the slightest clue whether we’ll make the short list, or even how many of the nominee slots will go to English-language novels at all.

In fact, depending on the enthusiasm of the Japanese Worldcon members for making nominations, it’s possible that no English-language novels will make the cut. If you think it can’t happen, I’ll just mention that I got onto the Hugo ballet last year with 45 nominating votes, and two other nominees got on with 46 and 47 votes. With these numbers in mind, consider if you will the fact that the Worldcon will be in Japan for the very first time, which means that for a great number of Japanese fans, this is the first time they’ll be able to nominate and vote on the Hugos. How motivated do you think these Japanese fans will be to nominate, and to vote? Let’s just say I don’t think 2007 will be the year in which 45 nominating votes gets a book on the shortlist.

I should also note that the challenges I see for English-language novels this year I also see for all English-language potential nominees — there ought to be and almost certainly will be lots of Japanese nominees in every category. What I’m saying is, this is going to be a hell of an interesting year for the Hugos, and I’m looking forward to seeing how it all sorts out.

Having said that, in addition to pimping my own Hugo-eligible work here, allow me to remind you folks that every story in the Subterranean Magazine issue I edited is also eligible for consideration for the Short Story Hugo, and that you can download a free pdf version of the Magazine by clicking on this link right here. There are some truly excellent stories in there, and I know that I’ll be nominating more than one. Also, I’d note that the story I published here on the Whatever last year, “Who Put the Bomp?” by Nick Mamatas and Eliani Torres, is award-eligible as well (and good enough to nominate), and personally I think it would rock if a story published on a blog (but paid for with a genre-standard rate) got a short story nomination.

I’m done award pimping now.

Where in the World Will John Scalzi Be?

Because I know how much my stalkers hate having to guess where I’ll be, here are my current convention plans for the first part of 2007.

January 19-21: Moonbase ConFusion, in Troy, Michigan

February 16-18: Boskone, in Boston, Massachusetts

April 20-22: Penguicon, in Troy, Michigan (what did Troy do to deserve two SF conventions? Beats me)

May 25-28: Wiscon, in Madison, Wisconsin

July 6-8: The Heinlein Centennial, in Kansas City, Missouri

At Penguicon I’ll be a Nifty Guest, which is like a minor league guest of honor; at the Heinlein Centennial I’m a featured guest. At ConFusion and Boskone, I’ll be just a common schmoe.

I don’t have the second half of 2007 planned yet in terms of appearances. I haven’t decided yet about Worldcon; I’d like to go, but I’d need to figure out the logistics (and the cost). I do suspect I’ll want to go to other conventions in the second half of 2007 (I’ll have The Last Colony to flog, after all), and it might be a good thing to try some conventions that are new to me. If anyone has suggestions for good science fiction cons in the second half of the year, I’m open to suggestion.

Aside from conventions, I’ll also be doing bookstore and library appearances; in fact, I have a bookstore appearance in Cincinnati later this month (1/25, at the Joseph-Beth Bookstore — I’ll give this its own entry soon); I’ll let you all know when other such events and appearances occur.

That’s my 2007 appearance schedule so far. Let the stalking commence!