Daily Archives: February 8, 2007

For Your Voting Pleasure: The 2007 Locus Poll & Survey

To vote for a Hugo, you have to be a member of that year’s Worldcon. To vote for a Nebula, you have to be a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. But to vote for a Locus Award? All you have to be is you. And you’re already you! Or were the last time I checked. So you can vote.

Here’s how to do it: Go to this site, enter your name and an e-mail address near the top of the form, and choose your selections for the various categories. Locus has drop-down menus so you can choose books from that magazine’s “Recommended Reading” list for 2006, or (and this will be important in the next paragraph), you can enter the name of another book and author in the blank line to the right of each drop down box. You can vote for up to five books/people in each category (but for each only once in its category). If I remember correctly, the numbers on the side of each form correspond to an actual ranking, so just in case, put your favorites in the top slots.

Some of you will notice that neither The Ghost Brigades nor The Android’s Dream, both published in 2006, got onto Locus‘ Recommended Reading list in the category of Best SF Novel, so you will find neither in Locus‘ handy drop-down lists. Yes, I know. I’m sure it was merely a clerical oversight. Twice. Naturally, both books will be at a disadvantage in the general voting because they’re not in the handy-dandy drop-down list. Nevertheless, if you feel in your wisdom that one or both (!) books should be considered for Locus‘ Best SF Novel award, simply enter my last name and the name of the book in one of the blank spaces in that category. Locus‘ preferred way of writing these out would look like this:

Scalzi, The Ghost Brigades

and/or

Scalzi, The Android’s Dream

Feel free to cut and paste those if it helps. I’m all about making it easy.

I note with some confusion that Locus also appears not have recommended any stories from Subterranean #4 for their Best Short Story category; another clerical error, I’m sure. Well, you can still nominate up to five of those stories as well, by adding them into the blanks. Here’s the pdf of Subterranean #4 to refresh your memory of the authors and titles. And don’t forget “Who Put the Bomp?” either!

Be sure to look through all the categories; notwithstanding the inexplicable clerical errors mentioned above, harumph harumph, there are some excellent suggestions in each category. After you’re done filling out the various categories, Locus also has a demographic survey at the bottom. Please do fill it out to your level of informational comfort, so that Locus can have a reasonably accurate model of what today’s science fiction readers look like.

One poll to a customer; don’t try to game the system by filling out multiple surveys. That’s just silly.

I think it’s pretty cool that Locus opens up this poll and survey to everyone, not just subscribers, so I do hope you take advantage of the opportunity to put in your vote on what’s the best SF of 2006. Have fun with it, folks.

For Your Voting Pleasure: The 2007 Locus Poll & Survey

To vote for a Hugo, you have to be a member of that year’s Worldcon. To vote for a Nebula, you have to be a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. But to vote for a Locus Award? All you have to be is you. And you’re already you! Or were the last time I checked. So you can vote.

Here’s how to do it: Go to this site, enter your name and an e-mail address near the top of the form, and choose your selections for the various categories. Locus has drop-down menus so you can choose books from that magazine’s “Recommended Reading” list for 2006, or (and this will be important in the next paragraph), you can enter the name of another book and author in the blank line to the right of each drop down box. You can vote for up to five books/people in each category (but for each only once in its category). If I remember correctly, the numbers on the side of each form correspond to an actual ranking, so just in case, put your favorites in the top slots.

Some of you will notice that neither The Ghost Brigades nor The Android’s Dream, both published in 2006, got onto Locus‘ Recommended Reading list in the category of Best SF Novel, so you will find neither in Locus‘ handy drop-down lists. Yes, I know. I’m sure it was merely a clerical oversight. Twice. Naturally, both books will be at a disadvantage in the general voting because they’re not in the handy-dandy drop-down list. Nevertheless, if you feel in your wisdom that one or both (!) books should be considered for Locus‘ Best SF Novel award, simply enter my last name and the name of the book in one of the blank spaces in that category. Locus‘ preferred way of writing these out would look like this:

Scalzi, The Ghost Brigades

and/or

Scalzi, The Android’s Dream

Feel free to cut and paste those if it helps. I’m all about making it easy.

I note with some confusion that Locus also appears not have recommended any stories from Subterranean #4 for their Best Short Story category; another clerical error, I’m sure. Well, you can still nominate up to five of those stories as well, by adding them into the blanks. Here’s the pdf of Subterranean #4 to refresh your memory of the authors and titles. And don’t forget “Who Put the Bomp?” either!

Be sure to look through all the categories; notwithstanding the inexplicable clerical errors mentioned above, harumph harumph, there are some excellent suggestions in each category. After you’re done filling out the various categories, Locus also has a demographic survey at the bottom. Please do fill it out to your level of informational comfort, so that Locus can have a reasonably accurate model of what today’s science fiction readers look like.

One poll to a customer; don’t try to game the system by filling out multiple surveys. That’s just silly.

I think it’s pretty cool that Locus opens up this poll and survey to everyone, not just subscribers, so I do hope you take advantage of the opportunity to put in your vote on what’s the best SF of 2006. Have fun with it, folks.

For Your Voting Pleasure: The 2007 Locus Poll & Survey

To vote for a Hugo, you have to be a member of that year’s Worldcon. To vote for a Nebula, you have to be a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. But to vote for a Locus Award? All you have to be is you. And you’re already you! Or were the last time I checked. So you can vote.

Here’s how to do it: Go to this site, enter your name and an e-mail address near the top of the form, and choose your selections for the various categories. Locus has drop-down menus so you can choose books from that magazine’s “Recommended Reading” list for 2006, or (and this will be important in the next paragraph), you can enter the name of another book and author in the blank line to the right of each drop down box. You can vote for up to five books/people in each category (but for each only once in its category). If I remember correctly, the numbers on the side of each form correspond to an actual ranking, so just in case, put your favorites in the top slots.

Some of you will notice that neither The Ghost Brigades nor The Android’s Dream, both published in 2006, got onto Locus‘ Recommended Reading list in the category of Best SF Novel, so you will find neither in Locus‘ handy drop-down lists. Yes, I know. I’m sure it was merely a clerical oversight. Twice. Naturally, both books will be at a disadvantage in the general voting because they’re not in the handy-dandy drop-down list. Nevertheless, if you feel in your wisdom that one or both (!) books should be considered for Locus‘ Best SF Novel award, simply enter my last name and the name of the book in one of the blank spaces in that category. Locus‘ preferred way of writing these out would look like this:

Scalzi, The Ghost Brigades

and/or

Scalzi, The Android’s Dream

Feel free to cut and paste those if it helps. I’m all about making it easy.

I note with some confusion that Locus also appears not have recommended any stories from Subterranean #4 for their Best Short Story category; another clerical error, I’m sure. Well, you can still nominate up to five of those stories as well, by adding them into the blanks. Here’s the pdf of Subterranean #4 to refresh your memory of the authors and titles. And don’t forget “Who Put the Bomp?” either!

Be sure to look through all the categories; notwithstanding the inexplicable clerical errors mentioned above, harumph harumph, there are some excellent suggestions in each category. After you’re done filling out the various categories, Locus also has a demographic survey at the bottom. Please do fill it out to your level of informational comfort, so that Locus can have a reasonably accurate model of what today’s science fiction readers look like.

One poll to a customer; don’t try to game the system by filling out multiple surveys. That’s just silly.

I think it’s pretty cool that Locus opens up this poll and survey to everyone, not just subscribers, so I do hope you take advantage of the opportunity to put in your vote on what’s the best SF of 2006. Have fun with it, folks.

For Your Voting Pleasure: The 2007 Locus Poll & Survey

To vote for a Hugo, you have to be a member of that year’s Worldcon. To vote for a Nebula, you have to be a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. But to vote for a Locus Award? All you have to be is you. And you’re already you! Or were the last time I checked. So you can vote.

Here’s how to do it: Go to this site, enter your name and an e-mail address near the top of the form, and choose your selections for the various categories. Locus has drop-down menus so you can choose books from that magazine’s “Recommended Reading” list for 2006, or (and this will be important in the next paragraph), you can enter the name of another book and author in the blank line to the right of each drop down box. You can vote for up to five books/people in each category (but for each only once in its category). If I remember correctly, the numbers on the side of each form correspond to an actual ranking, so just in case, put your favorites in the top slots.

Some of you will notice that neither The Ghost Brigades nor The Android’s Dream, both published in 2006, got onto Locus‘ Recommended Reading list in the category of Best SF Novel, so you will find neither in Locus‘ handy drop-down lists. Yes, I know. I’m sure it was merely a clerical oversight. Twice. Naturally, both books will be at a disadvantage in the general voting because they’re not in the handy-dandy drop-down list. Nevertheless, if you feel in your wisdom that one or both (!) books should be considered for Locus‘ Best SF Novel award, simply enter my last name and the name of the book in one of the blank spaces in that category. Locus‘ preferred way of writing these out would look like this:

Scalzi, The Ghost Brigades

and/or

Scalzi, The Android’s Dream

Feel free to cut and paste those if it helps. I’m all about making it easy.

I note with some confusion that Locus also appears not have recommended any stories from Subterranean #4 for their Best Short Story category; another clerical error, I’m sure. Well, you can still nominate up to five of those stories as well, by adding them into the blanks. Here’s the pdf of Subterranean #4 to refresh your memory of the authors and titles. And don’t forget “Who Put the Bomp?” either!

Be sure to look through all the categories; notwithstanding the inexplicable clerical errors mentioned above, harumph harumph, there are some excellent suggestions in each category. After you’re done filling out the various categories, Locus also has a demographic survey at the bottom. Please do fill it out to your level of informational comfort, so that Locus can have a reasonably accurate model of what today’s science fiction readers look like.

One poll to a customer; don’t try to game the system by filling out multiple surveys. That’s just silly.

I think it’s pretty cool that Locus opens up this poll and survey to everyone, not just subscribers, so I do hope you take advantage of the opportunity to put in your vote on what’s the best SF of 2006. Have fun with it, folks.

For Your Voting Pleasure: The 2007 Locus Poll & Survey

To vote for a Hugo, you have to be a member of that year’s Worldcon. To vote for a Nebula, you have to be a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. But to vote for a Locus Award? All you have to be is you. And you’re already you! Or were the last time I checked. So you can vote.

Here’s how to do it: Go to this site, enter your name and an e-mail address near the top of the form, and choose your selections for the various categories. Locus has drop-down menus so you can choose books from that magazine’s “Recommended Reading” list for 2006, or (and this will be important in the next paragraph), you can enter the name of another book and author in the blank line to the right of each drop down box. You can vote for up to five books/people in each category (but for each only once in its category). If I remember correctly, the numbers on the side of each form correspond to an actual ranking, so just in case, put your favorites in the top slots.

Some of you will notice that neither The Ghost Brigades nor The Android’s Dream, both published in 2006, got onto Locus‘ Recommended Reading list in the category of Best SF Novel, so you will find neither in Locus‘ handy drop-down lists. Yes, I know. I’m sure it was merely a clerical oversight. Twice. Naturally, both books will be at a disadvantage in the general voting because they’re not in the handy-dandy drop-down list. Nevertheless, if you feel in your wisdom that one or both (!) books should be considered for Locus‘ Best SF Novel award, simply enter my last name and the name of the book in one of the blank spaces in that category. Locus‘ preferred way of writing these out would look like this:

Scalzi, The Ghost Brigades

and/or

Scalzi, The Android’s Dream

Feel free to cut and paste those if it helps. I’m all about making it easy.

I note with some confusion that Locus also appears not have recommended any stories from Subterranean #4 for their Best Short Story category; another clerical error, I’m sure. Well, you can still nominate up to five of those stories as well, by adding them into the blanks. Here’s the pdf of Subterranean #4 to refresh your memory of the authors and titles. And don’t forget “Who Put the Bomp?” either!

Be sure to look through all the categories; notwithstanding the inexplicable clerical errors mentioned above, harumph harumph, there are some excellent suggestions in each category. After you’re done filling out the various categories, Locus also has a demographic survey at the bottom. Please do fill it out to your level of informational comfort, so that Locus can have a reasonably accurate model of what today’s science fiction readers look like.

One poll to a customer; don’t try to game the system by filling out multiple surveys. That’s just silly.

I think it’s pretty cool that Locus opens up this poll and survey to everyone, not just subscribers, so I do hope you take advantage of the opportunity to put in your vote on what’s the best SF of 2006. Have fun with it, folks.

French Art, Bulgarian Sales

levieilhomme.jpg

Not sure that I actually showed off the cover to the French-language version of Old Man’s War, so: Here it is. I don’t know if this is original art or art snitched from elsewhere; what’s going on in the artwork is close enough to an actual scene in the book that may be art done for the book. That would be lovely. Of course, if you recognize it from something else, let me know.

Also, some nice news: We’ve sold the rights to OMW and The Ghost Brigades in Bulgaria. Bulgaria! This pleases me immensely; I like the idea of the book hanging out in Sofia. I hear it’s a lovely city. That’s the eighth foreign language sale for OMW and the fifth for TGB. Nifty. Много благодаря, Bulgaria!

Sundry Notes, 2/8/07

Various small things:

* My e-mail appears to well and truly screwed at the moment: no mail coming in or out. It’s the mail server. If you’ve sent me e-mail in the last few hours, I would recommend sending it again… after a few hours. If you’re planning to send me e-mail, wait. If you’re expecting e-mail from me, manage your expectations. If you’ve neither sent me e-mail nor are expecting any from me, please, go about your day as usual. This mail interruption seems part of a larger problem my host provider’s having; I can’t get their Web page to come up either. However, my site is up. So that’s all right.

* Happy birthday to the fabulous Mary Robinette Kowal, who is celebrating her birthday by going out for Chinese food with friends. Wish I could be there. Ms. Kowal, as many of you know, did an absolutely excellent job as one of the readers of “The Sagan Diary”; honestly, I can’t get through her recording of Chapter Eight without weeping like a child. And that’s a good thing.

* Congratulations also to my friend Lawrence Schimel, whose anthology The Future is Queer is on the Lambda Literary Award long list. These lists will be whittled down to finalists in a couple of weeks.

* Justine Larbalestier, whose really excellent book Magic’s Child was just sent to me in hardcover, which should make you all jealous because it won’t be out for a month, is interviewed on BookSlut. I’m also planning to interview Justine next month; good thing she’s a talker.

* This fellow wants non-Americans to boycott “American cultural products,” on the rationale that “They are propaganda aimed at turning your children into mindless consumers and your nations into obedient colonies.” Damn it, I hate it when my subtext is that obvious! You non-Americans aren’t supposed to suspect my hegemony until after you’ve bought the book!

Honestly, I never know what to make of the frothy types such as this. But just for the record, non-Americans: I prefer you have children with fully-functioning brains, and that you go through life blissfully uncolonized by my country. I know that’s dreadfully unhegemonic of me. But, look: Hegemony is just so much damn work. I have other things to do, you know?