15 thoughts on “Oh, and Look, the Korean Version of Zoe’s Tale Arrived at the House Today

  1. Out of curiosity, what cover depicts one of your characters in a manner that most closely resembles the picture you have of them in your head?

  2. GREAT! Now, you might not imagine it, but I having your books in Korean means I can teach them in English, and we get to talk about your worlds in my English classes. I would much rather use your science fiction than Orson Scott’s, since I like your worlds. (I still teach Ender’s Game, since my kids get the fact that there is something really really wrong with that book.)

    I can’t promise you riches, but I can tell you that having this out in Korea gets you both twenty copies of the Korean, and twenty copies of the English. I’ll send you a picture the next time we read one in class.

  3. heh, they translated “old-man’s war” into “the elderlys’ war”. that’s not exactly how i thought of the series.

  4. ” “Out of curiosity, what cover depicts one of your characters in a manner that
    most closely resembles the picture you have of them in your head?” ”
    “The SubPress limited cover.”
    http://subterraneanpress.com/store/product_detail/zoes_tale ?

    I took the q. as general, not specific to “Zoe’s Tale,” but I suppose that talking
    about other novel’s covers would be off topic here.

    IMO. she doesn’t look sneaky enough on that cover, but it /is/ a good one, more
    like the artist has at least skimmed the book than most cover art demonstrates.

  5. Hangul is the Korean alphabet. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have the consonants (sounds) for f, r, v, and z. They substitute b for f, so instead of fish, they say bish; substitute l for r, so Lonald instead of Ronald, actually Lo-nal-duh. V is like f, they substitute b sound, so biolin instead of violin. And, finally, Koreans substitute the j sound for z, so Zoe sounds like Joey. Thus why the book cover actually read’s Joey’s Tale, or Jo-e E-yah-gi.

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