And Now, an EXCLUSIVE Sneak Preview of My Upcoming Graphic Novel, “Midnight Rises”

Midnight Rises being the graphic novel I wrote (and which Mike Choi illustrates) set in the same universe as, and immediately preceding the events of, Midnight Star, the video game I am working on with Industrial Toys, which is currently out to beta testers (of which I am one. Dudes. It is too much fun).

Midnight Rises is also in beta, of sorts, because we’re using the whiz-bang possibilities of the mobile interface to do very exciting things with the graphic novel and the story — in ways that will have a direct influence on the video game itself. That’s right, the graphic novel and the game talk to each other. It’s pretty cool.

In any event, I was going through my copy of the graphic novel and I came across the scene in which this particular dialogue bubble pops up. And I thought to myself, “Yup, I definitely wrote that.” So if you’re wondering if the Scalzi writing sensibility is going to make the transition to graphic novels more or less intact, well, here’s your first clue.

As for the rest of it: I’m really really really excited to show it to you. I am assured I will get to do that soon. I cannot wait.

15 thoughts on “And Now, an EXCLUSIVE Sneak Preview of My Upcoming Graphic Novel, “Midnight Rises”

  1. My first thought on reading the dialogue balloon — before reading the actual post — was, “Yup, that sounds like Scalzi”. Especially for anyone who follows your twitter stream, that tone of comically exaggerated aggression is familiar.

    I know little about graphic novels and practically nothing about gaming, so this question may just be ill-informed, but I’m wondering: what if the user/reader doesn’t want the novel and the game to talk to each other? Suppose I want to follow the graphic novel off on some odd tangent without having that influence game play. Will that be possible?

  2. Andrew Burday:

    If you don’t link the game and the graphic novel, then there will be no effect, no. (The game gives you the opportunity to register an identity).

  3. I also read the second word as “Nazis,” and I also got a whiff of Ellis mixed with my Scalzi. I will pay many of my monies to both of you if a collaboration ever happens.

  4. I’ve been ignoring storytelling in games since Ultima II, but this really intrigues me. Are consequences set it stone, or can you reread/replay with different outcomes?

  5. Hey John, sorry if this is a bit off-topic. A while back you mentioned that you read comics exclusively with Comixology now. Curious which titles you keep up with. What are your influences for Midnight Rises? Mike Choi’s art looks amazing. It’s a shame this is iDevice exclusive; I’d really like to check it out.

  6. Any chance the graphic novel will be ready for Emerald City Comicon?

    I’m so excited to see you there, I don’t know which book to get signed!

    (my daughter would also like to request that you write more teen sci-fi since there is so very little being published.)

  7. I agree with Andrew. It sounds like your tweets more than your books.

    Jemjewel, is there really so little? The publishing category is “Young Adult” (which sounds like it means people in their 20s but actually means teenagers) or YA, if that helps.

    Do you mean SF with teenage protagonists? Because otherwise I think most intelligent teenagers can handle most mainstream (I would say “adult” but that’s also a specific category!) SF. I’d particularly recommend the work of Lois McMaster Bujold (unless you’re concerned about some not-particularly-explicit sex), which has not only entertained me but, through reflection on the issues it raises, made me a better human being—without being in any way didactic or preachy.

    And, of course, all of Scalzi, even though AFAIK he’s only written one with a teenage protagonist.

    Now, if your daughter is 12 and reading teen SF, that might be a different story.

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