New Books and ARCs, 1/4/16

A new year and a new stack of books and ARCs that have come to the Scalzi Compound, including several novellas — the hot new format. What here looks good to you? Tell me in the comments.

35 thoughts on “New Books and ARCs, 1/4/16

  1. I must admit that the look of a brand new stack of books gives me nearly inappropriate drools, but I think I’m a relatively slow reader. So I pick my battles with volumes carefully. My mom will read anything, from murder mysteries, to romance (place where I roll my eyes), to Practical Beekeeping Guide and 1000 Things You Did Not Know About Your Body. When I commit to the book, I don’t just come over to the story for dinner, I move in: with all my furniture, pets, medical records, and overdue laundary basket. Does anyone else narrate books in your head? In voices, with passion? That sure slows me down, but can’t help it. And I narrated my way through the law school! Maybe it’s the English as a second language as well, or maybe the twitter-sized attention span… That’s why I love a good sequel. You just get right back to it wasting no time for introductions and courtship. There is also the part where when I pick a completely unfamiliar book, the first response is: “Excuse me, do I know you?” In a sense, it’s like meeting new people, introverts dread that kind of stuff. I wonder if there is a correlation…

  2. The Builders by Daniel Polanksy. Never heard of him before, but revenge tales can make for ripping good reads . . .

  3. I always wonder when I see you post these: how many of these do you actually get around to reading? I’m a fairly quick reader, but I’m quite sure I wouldn’t be up to reading every book you post before you post the next stack.

  4. ARC: advance readers copy.. Sent out pre official publication to book stores and distributors (and others) as advertising and encouragement. I think this is it…

  5. In as much as Tim Powers is our GOH at Capclave this year his new book would be what I’m most interested in.

  6. The Dark Days Club looks good. A Young Adult Regency Fantasy for a cold winter’s night. Will order it for the library.

  7. I really liked The Builders. Very quick read but quite enjoyable and cleverly-done. And new Tim Powers, hooray!

  8. Domnall and the Borrowed Child has an intriguing title, I’d definitely pick that up for a closer look, and the Deep Sea Diver’s Syndrome too, as I scuba. (But if it’s about diving disasters I’d have to put it back down again! No sense scaring myself out of a hobby I love.)

  9. Sir Scalzi, I have so many questions re your specific books, and re many things in general. Since I’m new to the Whatever, it’s an exciting toy for me at this point. Is there an appropriate place where I can ask these questions? And if this thread is as good as any, I’d be delighted if you considered these few questions.
    1. How did you come up with the Old Man’s story/idea?
    2. Where do you get science part of your fiction? ( self-study or some science background?)
    3. Is there any chance to see SG Universe on screen again? And how did you like the experience working in a TV series production?
    4. In general, how people get into screenwriting for TV series?
    5. John Perry as a character reminded me (vaguely) Jack O’Neill (humor, disposition, personality). Are you personally a fan of Stargate?
    6. Star Trek or Star Wars?
    7. Would you consider a survey among fans who they would like to see as cast of the OMW TV show?
    8. If you had another life, but could keep all the money you made in this one, what would you like to do in life?
    I would understand if you just answered ’42’ to all of this, but also I would really appreciate some answers, to the extent your time and desire permits. Thanks!

  10. I Love reading and collecting hardcover books… but hardcover novellas, with some prices approaching the same as full length novels, leave me felling a little short changed. Like going to a fancy restaurant where the main course is a big platter with a tiny little food item in the center and lots of swirly sauce everywhere. Umm… I’m finished, still hungry and also broke.

    I know there are costs etc. etc. and I’ll be damned if I’ll buy an e-book I don’t actually “own” because of the DRM on it and that’s on me.

    I get it, but still… Where’s the Beef? :)

  11. I was never fortunate enough to get in on an ARC gig but I used to bring similar sized stacks of books home on a fairly frequent basis from the B&N down the street. When my wife and I started talking seriously about early retirement and began looking hard at where the money was going, my wife eventually asked me to pick between spending $300 a month on books and $300 a month on booze. I got a new library card. Skol!

  12. Thanks Josh. I thought he might not. Not a biggie. I’m surprised how he has time for those books of his with all of the social media he does. I’d much rather want him to write a new book then answer to my every question.

  13. If Can & Can’tankerous is one of the one to two books you read in a week, I would love to hear your thoughts on what Uncle Harlan wrote for us. Now, is it noon, yet? Back to work, mister.

  14. I really liked The Dark Days Club – the Regency period, but with things that go bump in the night and a very strong heroine. Perfect!

  15. Stephen Graham Jones! Seeing that in the stack, I said “ooh, he’s reading Native folks!!” (Yes, I said this out loud, but the cats remain unimpressed.) We’re often talking about diversity and it seems that even in that conversation, Indigenous folks tend to be footnotes, more written about than writing. (Not that they’re not writing, that’s not it at all — they’re just having a hard time accessing readers who expect Indians to act like Dances With Wolves.) Anyway, I’m excited to see Stephen Graham Jones in there because a) he’s great and b) it means Native voices are getting to a wider audience.

  16. “The Dark Days Club” title perks my interest. 2nd maybe “The Builders” (I was just looking at that on Amazon) and 3rd “Medusa’s Web.” I’ll be interested to see what you think of them.

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