Kirkus Review of The Collapsing Empire

It’s here, it’s positive, and it’s at the Kirkus site. Here’s the link.

My favorite line is the last: “Scalzi continues to be almost insufferably good at his brand of fun but think-y sci-fi adventure.”

“Almost insufferably good.” I love this sooooooo much.

20 thoughts on “Kirkus Review of The Collapsing Empire

  1. Tangential: Do you know yet who will be narrating the audiobook? (Apologies if you already addressed this; I may have missed it.)

  2. Only 57 days before I get to read it!

    Mal: As per Shiran (above), I think the narrator is going to be Daffy Duck.

  3. The pull quote reminds me of the fact that I go to the gym almost every day. I almost go Monday. I almost go Tuesday. I almost go Wednesday…. ;)

  4. I’m waiting for my signed copy to get here so I can review it myself… but.. Kirkus usually follows my tastes. ;-)

  5. Can’t wait to read it. Since easing your novella The God Engines, I’ve always wondered if you were a Warhammer 40k player. Now reading the description of “the Flow”, I thought I would ask.

  6. I’ll bet you do like the review, ending with “almost insufferably good”…!!!

    That’s almost as good as a review can get.

    Congrats. I like your stuff too.

  7. “just enough here that’s new” is a bit ungenerous but yes, a great exit line.

    Kirkus has its (very loud and often loudmouth) critics but I like it. When it comes to reviewers (and review sites) it’s important for readers that they are, in a way, predictable*. I’m generally in agreements with Kirkus’s verdicts, which means that I can take unseen gambles on books and almost never regret it.
    Which doesn’t mean Kirkus and I have great taste: simply that they jell.

    *This also works splendidly in the negative. There are reviewers I always disagree with, so their advice is also invariably useful to me.

  8. “Almost insufferably good.” I love this sooooooo much.

    If you do decide to get a coat of arms, I think this is a winner for the motto. “CAPAX TANTUM INTOLERANTIUS”. (“Capax” rather than “bonum”, I think, because it means good as in able or skilled rather than good as in morally worthy)

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