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Old & New

oldnew0519.jpg

Here’s an interesting contrast of things that came in the mail today: First, the Japanese version of Old Man’s War, and underneath that, a photocopy of a story collection of mine from 1984 — which, for those of you too lazy to do the math, was when I was but a callow sophomore in high school. I personally had no copies of these stories, but my friend Natasha, who did, sent me copies as a birthday present, because she rocks.

How are the stories, you ask? Well, pretty much exactly how you would expect stories from a 15-year-old boy who thought he was pretty damn clever would be (there’s a reason that in my advice to teen writers I make the notation that at their age, their writing pretty much sucks). Don’t worry, I won’t subject you to these stories. Be that as it may, it’s nice to have copies for my own archival purposes. Incidentally, this picture also confirms my story that that werd-ass signature of mine was something I worked on since I was a teenager; you can see a proto-version on the cover sheet there.

As for the Japanese copies of OMW, I note that it’s interesting that in the cover art the female soldiers’ nipples are protruding despite the fact she’s apparently wearing full body armor; those are some nipples, I’d have to say. It’s exciting to have these copies nevertheless. Now I have copies of OMW in every language in which is it published, except Chinese, Bulgarian, and Polish. Which reminds me, in case I forgot to mention it: I sold OMW and TGB in Polish. Go OMW.

One other publishing bit of note, regarding “The Sagan Diary”: The trade edition of TSD sold out its entire 2,000-copy first printing, which is pretty nice considering it’s a novelette, and there’s enough of a continuing demand that Subterranean has run a 1,500-copy second printing. If you kick in the 400-copy print run of TSD’s limited edition (a few of which are still available, incidentally), that means that there are now more copies of “The Sagan Diary” (3,900) than there are of the first printing of Old Man’s War (3,800). I think that’s pretty cool.

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Old & New

Here’s an interesting contrast of things that came in the mail today: First, the Japanese version of Old Man’s War, and underneath that, a photocopy of a story collection of mine from 1984 — which, for those of you too lazy to do the math, was when I was but a callow sophomore in high school. I personally had no copies of these stories, but my friend Natasha, who did, sent me copies as a birthday present, because she rocks.

How are the stories, you ask? Well, pretty much exactly how you would expect stories from a 15-year-old boy who thought he was pretty damn clever would be (there’s a reason that in my advice to teen writers I make the notation that at their age, their writing pretty much sucks). Don’t worry, I won’t subject you to these stories. Be that as it may, it’s nice to have copies for my own archival purposes. Incidentally, this picture also confirms my story that that werd-ass signature of mine was something I worked on since I was a teenager; you can see a proto-version on the cover sheet there.

As for the Japanese copies of OMW, I note that it’s interesting that in the cover art the female soldiers’ nipples are protruding despite the fact she’s apparently wearing full body armor; those are some nipples, I’d have to say. It’s exciting to have these copies nevertheless. Now I have copies of OMW in every language in which is it published, except Chinese, Bulgarian, and Polish. Which reminds me, in case I forgot to mention it: I sold OMW and TGB in Polish. Go OMW.

One other publishing bit of note, regarding “The Sagan Diary”: The trade edition of TSD sold out its entire 2,000-copy first printing, which is pretty nice considering it’s a novelette, and there’s enough of a continuing demand that Subterranean has run a 1,500-copy second printing. If you kick in the 400-copy print run of TSD’s limited edition (a few of which are still available, incidentally), that means that there are now more copies of “The Sagan Diary” (3,900) than there are of the first printing of Old Man’s War (3,800). I think that’s pretty cool.

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Things That Would Be Cool: A List

Hey, you know what would be cool?

1. The Cure doing a cover of Heart’s “Barracuda”

2. Battered, deep-fried M&Ms

3. A computerized guitar with LEDs in the neck so you could download tabs and chords into it of your favorite songs and learn how to play them that way

4. Alberto Gonzales receiving an enthusiastically hemorrhaging rectal polyp for every single lie he’s told during his testimony on the Hill

5. Everyone who is getting ready to type “Oh, yeah, how about [insert Democrat and/or Clinton administration figure] getting a [insert terrible physical punishment] for [insert alleged incident]?” into the comment thread for this entry suddenly being consumed by an unexpected pack of carnivorous goats, which just happens to be passing by their homes

6. Joan Jett fronting Van Halen

7. Some pie right about now

8. A hybrid engine lawn tractor (he said, after paying $40 for gas for his lawn tractor yesterday)

9. A remote controlled monkey

10. Oh, I don’t know what else. You tell me in the comment thread.

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Things That Would Be Cool: A List

Hey, you know what would be cool?

1. The Cure doing a cover of Heart’s “Barracuda”

2. Battered, deep-fried M&Ms

3. A computerized guitar with LEDs in the neck so you could download tabs and chords into it of your favorite songs and learn how to play them that way

4. Alberto Gonzales receiving an enthusiastically hemorrhaging rectal polyp for every single lie he’s told during his testimony on the Hill

5. Everyone who is getting ready to type “Oh, yeah, how about [insert Democrat and/or Clinton administration figure] getting a [insert terrible physical punishment] for [insert alleged incident]?” into the comment thread for this entry suddenly being consumed by an unexpected pack of carnivorous goats, which just happens to be passing by their homes

6. Joan Jett fronting Van Halen

7. Some pie right about now

8. A hybrid engine lawn tractor (he said, after paying $40 for gas for his lawn tractor yesterday)

9. A remote controlled monkey

10. Oh, I don’t know what else. You tell me in the comment thread.

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The Dictator of Writing Announces His Decrees, Part I

Certain events of the past few days have convinced me that most of writerdom has trouble finding its own ass without a claque of workshop buddies to comment on the journey (“I like the way you used your hands to search, but did you really need to use the flashlight?”). So in the interest of all writers, who I feel crave strong, confident demogoguery, I have staged a coup, and am now The Beloved and Inspirational Forward-Thinking and Righteous Leader Amongst the Scribes, or, more colloquially, The Dictator of Writing. Having “remaindered” all those who oppose me (or, even worse, sidelined them into SFWA board slots), I am now ready to issue decrees, which all writers must henceforth follow, on penalty of death and/or being eternally blue-pencilled by the sort of officiously tone-deaf copy editor who ate the Chicago Manual of Style when she was 14 and has been barfing it up ever since.

The decrees!

1. By Order of the Dictator of Writing, No Writer Will Be Allowed To Write Professionally Without Having First Taken a Remedial Business Course. Because, damn, people. You folks don’t have a lick of sense about that whole “money” thing. Just as writers can write about anything as long as it’s not what they’re supposed to be writing, so can they spend their money on anything, as long as it’s not what they’re supposed to be spending it on (like, you know, bills and rent and taxes and food). Of course, it’s not just you. Dostoevsky spent all his money gambling; F. Scott Fitzgerald drank a lot of his (he had help from Zelda) and was in the habit of asking for loans from his agent, which is clearly a trick I need to try. However, just because Dostoevsky and Fitzgerald pissed away their money doesn’t mean the rest of you get to — at least we got Crime and Punishment and The Great Gatsby out of them.

So: Remedial business courses for the lot of you. You will learn how to manage your money, by God. You will learn how to budget. You will learn how to stretch your income so that you don’t end up eying the cat for its protein value during the final days of the month. You will learn how keep a ledger of accounts receivable, so you’ll know just who is screwing you out of your money and for how long they’ve been doing it. You will learn the tax code, so you can pay your quarterlies on time and you can be clear on what’s a business expense and what is not. You will learn how to save, damn you, so that when life hands you that inevitable surprise gut punch that costs two grand, you don’t have to pawn your children. And for the love of Christ, you will learn that just because you have a $10,000 credit limit on that plastic rectangle of evil what resides in your wallet, it doesn’t mean you have to spend it.

You say you don’t need remedial business courses? Great! How much credit card debt do you have? How long have you been waiting for that money to come in? How many minutes per pound do you think Frisky the Cat needs in the oven at 375 degrees? And on what notice is your electric bill?

Hmmmm. Well, see. This is why you need a Dictator of Writing.

2. By Order of the Dictator of Writing, Undergraduate Creative Writing Programs are Abolished. Really, what a waste of your parents’ $37,000 a year. Take a couple of writing courses, if you must (make sure one of them teaches you all the grammar you flaked out on in high school). You can even major in English, if you really want to. But shunting yourself into a writing program at an age where you don’t know a single damn thing about life is a fine way to make sure you’re never anything more than someone who is clever with words. We’ve got enough of those, thank you kindly. So no more of that. Learn something else, why don’t you. Something you can bring to the table when you start writing, so what you’re writing has something else going for it besides the vacuum-packed pedantry of a creative writing education. Or, heavens forfend, learn something useful and practical, so that you don’t actually have to starve while you’re giving writing a go once you get out of college. Related to this:

3. By Order of the Dictator of Writing, Every Person Intending to Get an MFA in Any Sort of Writing Must First Spend Three Years in The Real World, Hopefully Doing Something Noble and Selfless. Like, I don’t know, teaching. Or forestry service. Or the military or Peace Corps. Or taking housecats out for refreshing walks in the countryside. You know. Anything. (Except working in a coffee shop. Just what the world needs: Another barrista who writes.) By doing anything else but writing, you will open up your brain to the needs and concerns of other people and things, because, among other things, empathy will make you a better writer, and it will also make you a whole lot less insufferable. Also all that craft you’re learning won’t mean a damn thing if the only sort of life experience you can model is the life of an MFA grad, since among other things, most of one’s audience isn’t going to be down with that. “His struggles in a setting of academic privilege are eerily like my own!” Well, yes, if all you’re doing is writing for other MFA grads. Otherwise, not so much. Which reminds me:

4. By Order of the Dictator of Writing, Writing to Impress Other Writers is Punishable by Death. Honestly. You want to impress another writer with your emanations, set a pot of chili between you and then lock the door. Aside from that, think of the poor reader, who just wants to be entertained, and does not know or care that you are trying to impress that fellow writer whom you loathe, or want to get into the pants of, or both. Won’t you please give a thought to the readers? Especially when death is on the line?

Perhaps to enforce this sentiment, and to cut down the number of needless deaths among writers, we should institute a program like the following:

SCENE: A writer’s garret: WRITER is hammering out immortal prose. There is a knock on the DOOR.

WRITER (opening the door to find a large, burly man in the doorway): Who are you?

JOE: I am Joe, sent to you by the Dictator of Writing to help you in your task. I am a reader of average intelligence. Is that your latest work in your hand?

WRITER: Why yes, yes, it is.

JOE: Will you read it to me?

WRITER: Well, it’s a work in progress.

JOE: Of course. I understand completely.

WRITER (clears throat): “I blanketed myself with wrath incarnadine –”

JOE punches WRITER in the gut. WRITER falls to the FLOOR.

WRITER (gasping and writhing): Why did you do that?

JOE: I didn’t follow that sentence. And when that happens, I am authorized to beat you.

WRITER: Let me fix it. (WRITER crawls to DESK, grabs a PEN, and makes an EDIT)

JOE: What does it say now?

WRITER: “I got mad.”

JOE kicks WRITER in the TESTICLES. WRITER collapses.

JOE: Now you’re just being condescending.

5. By Order of the Dictator of Writing, All Writers Must Be Editors For At Least One Year. Because then you will understand why editors suggest changes: To save writers from themselves. Yes, I know it is hard to believe that your perfect prose can be improved upon a single jot, but once you’ve done heroic and dramatic rescues of other writers’ unfortunate prose pileups, you will at least have an inkling of why those editorial types do what they do.

Also, a good solid twelve months of having to slog through a slush pile will serve to tighten up your own work, because every time something you do reminds you of some piece of crap you found marinating in the slush pile, your brain will actually revulse and your fingers will spasm in the phalangical equivalent of a gag reflex, and you’ll find some other way to make your point, one that, incidentally, won’t cause some poor bastard editor pain somewhere down the line. And that’s good for you.

The Dictator of Writing is now bored with issuing decrees! More will come at a future time, when he has angrily stewed some more! Now go! And bask in my glorious rule!

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Amish Cat is Amish

“I must say, Scalzi’s hand-written LOLCAT crosses some meme boundary that I have yet to put my finger on. Somehow it brings light to the idea that LOLCATs don’t exist entirely on the internet, which is near-blasphemy.”

“Subspace,” in the “Yes, Yes. Cats and Captions. Very Nice.” comment thread

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Yes, Yes. Cats and Captions. Very Nice.

You can all stop sending me links to this cartoon, now. I’ve seen it.

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Yes, Yes. Cats and Captions. Very Nice.

You can all stop sending me links to this cartoon, now. I’ve seen it.

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Upcoming Events/Appearances

Now that I’m back from my tour, you’d think I would never want to leave home again, and indeed roght now, I don’t — and won’t! So there. However, in a week or so I’ll start showing up in public again, because, well, what can I say. I like people.

So, for the stalkers, here are the places I know I’ll be through the end of the year. This list isn’t definitive in the sense that these will be the only places I’ll be — it’s entirely possible I’ll tuck in a few more dates here and there as 2007 goes along — but these are the things I’ve said “yes” to.

5/22, Columbus, Ohio — Reading/Signing at Barnes & Noble (1739 Olentangy River Road) at 7pm.

5/24, Dayton, Ohio — Reading/Signing at Books & Co (at The Greene) at 7pm.

5/31, Cincinnati, Ohio — Reading/Signing at Joseph-Beth Booksellers (2692 Madison Rd), 7pm

6/6, Eaton, Ohio — Library appearance, at (I think) 7pm. More details coming.

6/22 – 6/24, Washington DC — ALA Conference, where with others I will speaking on “The Literature of Ideas.”

6/30, Kokomo, IN — Signing at Don’s Books at 1pm. With Tobias “Ragamuffin” Buckell.

7/6 – 7/8, Kansas City, MO — The Heinlein Centennial, where I’ll be full of panelist goodness.

8/3 – 8/5, Mountain View, CA — Science Foo Camp (a bunch of scientists, techno-geeks and etc hanging out at Google and thinking of new and exciting ways to TAKE OVER THE WORLD)

10/31 – 11/4, Nantes, France — Utopiales: Festival International de Science-Fiction de Nantes. A big deal over there; gets something like 35,000 visitors each year. Since I have a number of European editions out now, this seems like a good time to visit. And it will be my first time in France. w00t!

Other possible appearances between now and the end of 2007: Confluence, Capclave, Context (funny how all these science fiction conventions start with “C,” he said, only half-winkingly), all of whom have invited me, and which I’d like to attend, particularly Confluence, whom I’ve been stringing along for three years now, like a cad. I feel like such a heel about that. The problem this year is that it’s up against a long-standing personal commitment for that weekend (this is also why I was unable to consider Libertycon, which is also that weekend. Stupid real life). We’ll have to see.

I’m open to other convention possibilities between now and the end of 2007, pending workload and availability (and also financial considerations, because, you know, spending a few hundred dollars a shot to attend conventions adds up over time) so if programming committees want to ping me I can put them on the list to consider.

Speaking of financial considerations, I’m still on the bubble re: Nippon 2007; basically, I wouldn’t have time to do anything other than go there and come back, and I’m wondering whether it’s worth thousands of dollars to fly to a whole new country just to spend five days in a hotel and then fly right home (yes, I’m doing this at Utopiales, but there I’m a featured guest of the festival, which is nice). I’ll have to make a decision soon, in any event, because otherwise I’ll simply price myself out of consideration.

In any event, this is where I know I will be between now and 2008. Aside from being at home, of course, writing quality literature for y’all.

Update, 10:47pm — Well, definitely not going to Capclave this year; it’s the same weekend as my 20th high school reunion. Gotta go to that instead. Sorry, Capclave!

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Jerry Falwell Dead

Here’s the story. I guess now he’ll find out what Jesus really thought of many of his positions. Personally I suspect he might be surprised.

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So We’re Clear On This: No Mob Scenes

The relative wisdom of me noting that Amazon review yesterday is discussed here; naturally I am also taking part in the discussion.

One of the more interesting points in the discussion is the idea that by noting the review on Whatever, I am implicitly hinting to you, the loyal Whatever readers, that you need to berate and abuse this fellow for the temerity of not thinking I (or my work) am super-mega-ultra-wonderful in all respects; and commensurately, that all y’all are just champing at the bit to rain down derision on any one at whom I crook my finger. The reason this is suggest is, because, well, there are lots of other sites where this dynamic is indeed in play.

My general feeling is that Whatever readers are both smart enough to know that when I write on something here that what I don’t expect is a monotonous chorus of yes-folk in the comment threads, and savvy enough to in the ways of Scalzi that they would know that I would find a mad insensate rush to pummel and castigate someone I discussing to be in poor taste. I base this general feeling on the fact that Whatever readers are typically made of awesome, and are also real live grown-ups who don’t act like idjits. But just in case there are stragglers on these particular points, allow me to note the following:

1. Any assumption that I want all y’all to be yes-folk to every damn fool thing I say is wildly incorrect, and suggests you’ve not really been paying attention;

2. Acting like a dick to someone, on the Whatever or off it, because you think I would want you to, would in actuality make me a sad little clown. Please, don’t make me a sad little clown. I hate the costume and the facepaint gives me hives.

I trust this makes things sufficiently clear.

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When Amazon Reviews Amuse Me

I got a chuckle with this one-star review of Old Man’s War on Amazon:

Actually, the first chapter had a rather novel premise. A couple pages into the second chapter I threw the book into the trash. I will not stand for subliminally being preached to. Far, far too many references to religion and god. I wanted Sci-Fi not mythical fantasy. Caveat emptor.

I find the idea of being portrayed as a stealth proselytizer amusing beyond words.

I found this fellow’s e-mail and told him so, noted my personal profound agnostic state, and suggested he might give the book another try, or barring that, he might check out The Android’s Dream, which readers of the book will recall has a religion whose founder was an acknowledged fraud. We’ll see what the fellow thinks about that. In the meantime, I’m enjoying my holy state. Anyone want to be converted? Anyone? Hello?

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Dragon Page Cover to Cover Interview

While I was out on tour I stopped by the studios of The Dragon Page for an interview, in which I talked a bit about The Last Colony (warning: minor spoilers, nothing you won’t have revealed by reading a review), my writing process, International Pixel-Stained Technopeasant Day and Ficlets. It’s all ready for you to listen to right here. Enjoy.

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Dragon Page Cover to Cover Interview

While I was out on tour I stopped by the studios of The Dragon Page for an interview, in which I talked a bit about The Last Colony (warning: minor spoilers, nothing you won’t have revealed by reading a review), my writing process, International Pixel-Stained Technopeasant Day and Ficlets. It’s all ready for you to listen to right here. Enjoy.

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Various & Sundry 5/14/07

Little bits here and there, mostly wrapping up the SFWA election stuff:

* Here’s a nice review of The Last Colony by the San Diego Union Tribune, which calls the book “A lovely ending to a very neat trilogy that began with Old Man’s War and continued with The Ghost Brigades.” Excellent.

* David Moles, SFWA’s resident heretic (because someone has to be) has set up an entire CafePress shop with “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted for Scalzi” shirts, mugs and stickers. Get ’em just in time for SFWA’s next business meeting! (For those of you who aren’t members of SFWA, there’s also a “I would have voted for Scalzi, if only I had been eligible” store, too). I approve of all of this, although I suspect the “I Voted For Scalzi” thong underwear might be a bit much.

* Moles also has a somewhat more serious look at what a SFWA membership is good for, and his conclusion is: at this point, not a whole lot. Bearing in mind that Moles has a somewhat unique perspective (he is, after all, currently under censure by SFWA for posting bits from its private boards on his Web page), neither is his perspective completely wrong.

I do think it’s entirely fair to say that SFWA, as an organization, is at a crisis point; not the first in its life, nor possibly the last, or even the most critical, but a crisis point nonetheless. The crisis today is one of its identity: Is it primarily an organization of and for working writers, or it is a clubhouse for science fiction enthusiasts who at one point also wrote some science fiction? Clearly I think it needs to be the former, which is why I ran for president. I think Mr. Capobianco, who won the election, has an opportunity to swing the perception of what SFWA is back toward that; it will take rather a lot of work, and I hope he’s up for it.

* Folks have also asked me what thoughts I have about the current post-SFWA election fracas du jour, the details of which I should not discuss here, because most of said details of it are currently unfolding in SFWA’s private areas. This much I will say: Look, either the party in question will do the right and ethical thing, or they won’t. If they do the right and ethical thing, and quickly, then people will probably cut them some slack and move on. If they don’t do the right and ethical thing, then people in SFWA will continue to think what I suspect a lot of them are thinking right about now, i.e., this person is a lying sack of shit. It’s entirely up to this person how this will play out.

Sorry for you non-SFWAns that I can’t be more direct about this. I’m glad I don’t have to deal with this issue, however, outside of my role as a general SFWA member.

* Finally, for the folks who are asking how I’m taking my defeat: Trust me, I’m fine. I’ve known for a couple of weeks that I didn’t win, which is enough time to internalize the result and move on. The good news is that I have lots to keep me busy. Rumor has it I’m working on a book, and as far as my editor knows, I am! So that’s good.

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Various & Sundry 5/14/07

Little bits here and there, mostly wrapping up the SFWA election stuff:

* Here’s a nice review of The Last Colony by the San Diego Union Tribune, which calls the book “A lovely ending to a very neat trilogy that began with Old Man’s War and continued with The Ghost Brigades.” Excellent.

* David Moles, SFWA’s resident heretic (because someone has to be) has set up an entire CafePress shop with “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted for Scalzi” shirts, mugs and stickers. Get ’em just in time for SFWA’s next business meeting! (For those of you who aren’t members of SFWA, there’s also a “I would have voted for Scalzi, if only I had been eligible” store, too). I approve of all of this, although I suspect the “I Voted For Scalzi” thong underwear might be a bit much.

* Moles also has a somewhat more serious look at what a SFWA membership is good for, and his conclusion is: at this point, not a whole lot. Bearing in mind that Moles has a somewhat unique perspective (he is, after all, currently under censure by SFWA for posting bits from its private boards on his Web page), neither is his perspective completely wrong.

I do think it’s entirely fair to say that SFWA, as an organization, is at a crisis point; not the first in its life, nor possibly the last, or even the most critical, but a crisis point nonetheless. The crisis today is one of its identity: Is it primarily an organization of and for working writers, or it is a clubhouse for science fiction enthusiasts who at one point also wrote some science fiction? Clearly I think it needs to be the former, which is why I ran for president. I think Mr. Capobianco, who won the election, has an opportunity to swing the perception of what SFWA is back toward that; it will take rather a lot of work, and I hope he’s up for it.

* Folks have also asked me what thoughts I have about the current post-SFWA election fracas du jour, the details of which I should not discuss here, because most of said details of it are currently unfolding in SFWA’s private areas. This much I will say: Look, either the party in question will do the right and ethical thing, or they won’t. If they do the right and ethical thing, and quickly, then people will probably cut them some slack and move on. If they don’t do the right and ethical thing, then people in SFWA will continue to think what I suspect a lot of them are thinking right about now, i.e., this person is a lying sack of shit. It’s entirely up to this person how this will play out.

Sorry for you non-SFWAns that I can’t be more direct about this. I’m glad I don’t have to deal with this issue, however, outside of my role as a general SFWA member.

* Finally, for the folks who are asking how I’m taking my defeat: Trust me, I’m fine. I’ve known for a couple of weeks that I didn’t win, which is enough time to internalize the result and move on. The good news is that I have lots to keep me busy. Rumor has it I’m working on a book, and as far as my editor knows, I am! So that’s good.

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Various & Sundry 5/14/07

Little bits here and there, mostly wrapping up the SFWA election stuff:

* Here’s a nice review of The Last Colony by the San Diego Union Tribune, which calls the book “A lovely ending to a very neat trilogy that began with Old Man’s War and continued with The Ghost Brigades.” Excellent.

* David Moles, SFWA’s resident heretic (because someone has to be) has set up an entire CafePress shop with “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted for Scalzi” shirts, mugs and stickers. Get ’em just in time for SFWA’s next business meeting! (For those of you who aren’t members of SFWA, there’s also a “I would have voted for Scalzi, if only I had been eligible” store, too). I approve of all of this, although I suspect the “I Voted For Scalzi” thong underwear might be a bit much.

* Moles also has a somewhat more serious look at what a SFWA membership is good for, and his conclusion is: at this point, not a whole lot. Bearing in mind that Moles has a somewhat unique perspective (he is, after all, currently under censure by SFWA for posting bits from its private boards on his Web page), neither is his perspective completely wrong.

I do think it’s entirely fair to say that SFWA, as an organization, is at a crisis point; not the first in its life, nor possibly the last, or even the most critical, but a crisis point nonetheless. The crisis today is one of its identity: Is it primarily an organization of and for working writers, or it is a clubhouse for science fiction enthusiasts who at one point also wrote some science fiction? Clearly I think it needs to be the former, which is why I ran for president. I think Mr. Capobianco, who won the election, has an opportunity to swing the perception of what SFWA is back toward that; it will take rather a lot of work, and I hope he’s up for it.

* Folks have also asked me what thoughts I have about the current post-SFWA election fracas du jour, the details of which I should not discuss here, because most of said details of it are currently unfolding in SFWA’s private areas. This much I will say: Look, either the party in question will do the right and ethical thing, or they won’t. If they do the right and ethical thing, and quickly, then people will probably cut them some slack and move on. If they don’t do the right and ethical thing, then people in SFWA will continue to think what I suspect a lot of them are thinking right about now, i.e., this person is a lying sack of shit. It’s entirely up to this person how this will play out.

Sorry for you non-SFWAns that I can’t be more direct about this. I’m glad I don’t have to deal with this issue, however, outside of my role as a general SFWA member.

* Finally, for the folks who are asking how I’m taking my defeat: Trust me, I’m fine. I’ve known for a couple of weeks that I didn’t win, which is enough time to internalize the result and move on. The good news is that I have lots to keep me busy. Rumor has it I’m working on a book, and as far as my editor knows, I am! So that’s good.

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Open For Public Comment

Proposition: Red Vines (and their lesser cousins, Twizzlers) are better when slightly stale.

Discuss.

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Mothers’ Day 2007

Personally I think there’s something very 80s about this picture. I suspect it’s me going crazy with the checkerboards.

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Justine Larbalestier Rocks

It gives me an unreasonably large amount of pleasure to note that my pal Justine Larbalestier has won the Norton Award for her novel Magic or Madness. The Norton is SFWA’s award for excellent Young Adult work, and since MoM is indeed excellent, it was the right choice. Congratulations, Justine! Try to remember us little people. For the rest of you: Go get this book (and the sequels).

Here’s the other award winners at the Nebula ceremony last night. One thing interesting to note is that the novella winner, “Burn,” by James Patrick Kelly (w00t!) has the notation that it is the “podcast version.” I think it’s likely, then, that this is the first podcast to win a major literary award. Good on ya, Jim, you crazy Webscab, you!

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