Wireless Giveaway: Act Quickly! (UPDATE: All Gone!)

Update: 12:03pm: All the copies are claimed! Told you that you had to be quick.

Look! Subterranean Press publisher Bill Schafer is back with another book to give away! Let’s all lean in close and hear what he has to say:

Here’s another giveaway we’re sponsoring—this time for Charles Stross’s beyond excellent short story collection, Wireless. We think it, along with Alastair Reynolds’s Zima Blue, are probably the two strongest sf collections of the past five years or so.

The rules? Simple as always.

— You must be a US resident to enter.

— Send an email to subpress@gmail.com with the word “Wireless” in the subject line, and your name and address as the only text in the body of the email. (If your company automatically adds text to outgoing emails, don’t worry; it won’t disqualify you.)

— If you win a copy of Wireless, you agree to read it within three weeks of receipt and post a review on Amazon.com.

— We will not be sending emails to winners or losers. The only notification you’ll get is if you find a copy of the book in your mail in a week or so.

Now, for the downside. For the past few titles we’ve given away, we haven’t noticed an uptick in Amazon reviews. If the lack of participation by winners of the free books continues, we’ll discontinue sharing books we love with readers in this way. Capiche?

You heard the man: Get a free book, leave a review on Amazon. It’s a fair trade, is it not? Now, send in your e-mails. Last time it took about four minutes for all the books to get given out, so you need to be quick. Quick! Like a bunny!

19 Comments on “Wireless Giveaway: Act Quickly! (UPDATE: All Gone!)”

  1. changterhune – Before you hear lies from Chang Terhune himself, we thought we’d tell you the truth: without us, his old action figures, he’d be nowhere. He loved science fiction from way back and began reading it at an early age, but it was through us that he acted it all out. That’s what led to the writing. He watched a lot of science fiction shows like Star Trek, U.F.O, and movies, too. But we were always there to do his bidding. And it’s like they say: you always forget about the little people on your way up. Oh, the 70’s and early 80’s with him were good times! He’d use these blocks and make all the crazy buildings for us to be in his stories. I gotta say the kid’s imagination was pretty damn fertile. Oh, he had friends, but they just weren’t into it like him. He was like the Lance Armstrong of action figures. And of science fiction. At first, when he began writing in the eighth grade, we didn’t mind. He still made time for us. And we knew that when he was holding us in his sweaty little hands and he got that far off look in his eye, he’d come back to burying us in the back yard or - god forbid! – blowing us up with firecrackers. But it was worth it for a part in one of those stories. We loved him for it. He kept us around even when we were minus a leg or two - or even a head. In that mind of his, he found a use for all of us. Then he discovered girls. October, 1986. It was like the end of the world. One day we’re standing in the middle of this building block creation he’d pretended was some marble city on a planet near Alpha Centauri and the next we were stuck in a box in the closet. Not even a “See ya later!” Nope, it was into the closet, then we heard some high-pitched girly-giggles then silence. We didn’t see him for years. We got word about him once in a while. Heard he took up writing, but it was crap like “The Breakfast Club” only with better music. We couldn’t believe it. Not Charlie. What happened to those aliens with heads he’d sculpted out of wax? Spaceships? Those complex plots? All gone. For what? You guessed it: Girls. Emotions. “Serious fiction.” I tell you, it was like hearing Elvis had left the building. During our two decade exile in the closet, we heard other things about him. He went to college. He wrote a lot, but not much he really liked. We knew it even then. It was like he didn’t dare write science fiction. Some of us had lost hope and just lay there. Others kept vigil, hoping for a day we didn’t dare speak about. Then we heard he’d stopped writing in 1996. Did he come to reclaim us? No. He took up music for ten years or so. He took up yoga. Once in a while, he’d visit us in the closet. But it was half-hearted. His mind was elsewhere. Then one day, he really did come back for us. One second we’re in the dark and the next thing we know we’re in a car headed for Massachusetts. Suddenly we got a whole shelf to ourselves out in broad daylight! Then he bought a bunch of others form some planet called Ebay. He’d just sit and stare at us with that old look. But why were we suddenly back in the picture? He had a wife now, who didn’t mind that he played with us. So what had happened? Turns out he’d never forgotten about those stories. He’d been thinking about all of us and the stories he’d made up and then remembered he’d been a writer once. From the shelf we could see him typing away. Before long he’s got a whole novel together! Then he’s working on another one. Word is there are two more in the planning stages! Some short stories, too! It’s good to see him using his imagination again. Its good to know he never abandoned us. He returned to his true love of science fiction. We hear the stories are pretty good. Someday we’ll get one of the cats to score us a copy of the manuscript. Man, it’s good to be out of the damn closet! --- I'm smarter than you I'm harder than you I'm better than you I'm just raw I'm hotter than you More popular than you More clever than you And goshdarn it, people like me I'm smarter than you I'm harder than you I'm better than you I'm just raw I'm hotter than you More popular than you More clever than you And goshdarn it, people like me
    changterhune

    Woot! I wannnnt it!!!

  2. changterhune – Before you hear lies from Chang Terhune himself, we thought we’d tell you the truth: without us, his old action figures, he’d be nowhere. He loved science fiction from way back and began reading it at an early age, but it was through us that he acted it all out. That’s what led to the writing. He watched a lot of science fiction shows like Star Trek, U.F.O, and movies, too. But we were always there to do his bidding. And it’s like they say: you always forget about the little people on your way up. Oh, the 70’s and early 80’s with him were good times! He’d use these blocks and make all the crazy buildings for us to be in his stories. I gotta say the kid’s imagination was pretty damn fertile. Oh, he had friends, but they just weren’t into it like him. He was like the Lance Armstrong of action figures. And of science fiction. At first, when he began writing in the eighth grade, we didn’t mind. He still made time for us. And we knew that when he was holding us in his sweaty little hands and he got that far off look in his eye, he’d come back to burying us in the back yard or - god forbid! – blowing us up with firecrackers. But it was worth it for a part in one of those stories. We loved him for it. He kept us around even when we were minus a leg or two - or even a head. In that mind of his, he found a use for all of us. Then he discovered girls. October, 1986. It was like the end of the world. One day we’re standing in the middle of this building block creation he’d pretended was some marble city on a planet near Alpha Centauri and the next we were stuck in a box in the closet. Not even a “See ya later!” Nope, it was into the closet, then we heard some high-pitched girly-giggles then silence. We didn’t see him for years. We got word about him once in a while. Heard he took up writing, but it was crap like “The Breakfast Club” only with better music. We couldn’t believe it. Not Charlie. What happened to those aliens with heads he’d sculpted out of wax? Spaceships? Those complex plots? All gone. For what? You guessed it: Girls. Emotions. “Serious fiction.” I tell you, it was like hearing Elvis had left the building. During our two decade exile in the closet, we heard other things about him. He went to college. He wrote a lot, but not much he really liked. We knew it even then. It was like he didn’t dare write science fiction. Some of us had lost hope and just lay there. Others kept vigil, hoping for a day we didn’t dare speak about. Then we heard he’d stopped writing in 1996. Did he come to reclaim us? No. He took up music for ten years or so. He took up yoga. Once in a while, he’d visit us in the closet. But it was half-hearted. His mind was elsewhere. Then one day, he really did come back for us. One second we’re in the dark and the next thing we know we’re in a car headed for Massachusetts. Suddenly we got a whole shelf to ourselves out in broad daylight! Then he bought a bunch of others form some planet called Ebay. He’d just sit and stare at us with that old look. But why were we suddenly back in the picture? He had a wife now, who didn’t mind that he played with us. So what had happened? Turns out he’d never forgotten about those stories. He’d been thinking about all of us and the stories he’d made up and then remembered he’d been a writer once. From the shelf we could see him typing away. Before long he’s got a whole novel together! Then he’s working on another one. Word is there are two more in the planning stages! Some short stories, too! It’s good to see him using his imagination again. Its good to know he never abandoned us. He returned to his true love of science fiction. We hear the stories are pretty good. Someday we’ll get one of the cats to score us a copy of the manuscript. Man, it’s good to be out of the damn closet! --- I'm smarter than you I'm harder than you I'm better than you I'm just raw I'm hotter than you More popular than you More clever than you And goshdarn it, people like me I'm smarter than you I'm harder than you I'm better than you I'm just raw I'm hotter than you More popular than you More clever than you And goshdarn it, people like me
    changterhune

    Damn. Guess I’ll have to buy it like the rest of ’em!

  3. I might need to stop doing this whole RSS thingy with the Whatever. It’s just demoralizing to keep getting posts about free books I totally missed out on! :)

  4. To Bill Schafer–

    I volunteer to receive ARCs from SubPress and to promptly post honest reviews on Amazon. All in the interests of public service, of course.

    Just think of it, Bill. No more messy contests. No more gajillions of emails to sort through, taking you away from your all-important publisher-type duties. No more worries about whether you will see an uptick in Amazon reviews, or if you’re simply wasting your time (and publicity copies).

    Just a quiet assurance that at least one reader will get the job done for you. (And of course there may be others who want to volunteer as well. But remember — I VOLUNTEERED FIRST.)

    Plus, I won’t miss all these contests because I’m at work when you run ’em. Which is admittedly the biggest benefit of all.

    Whaddaya say, Bill? I’ll be glad to follow-up with an email if you’re interested.

  5. I’ve recently picked up a copy a few weeks ago from my local Borders (of all places – it was in the “bargain bin”) – I’ll post a review – so far I’ve only read the Hugo nominated short story “Palimpset” – which is fun in a mind-twisty sort of way

    Bill- are you planning on releasing a Limited edition of this book?

  6. I have not had a chance to read Charlie Stross’s books yet, but I do like his blog. I heard about him when I stumbled on an interview Nobel Prize winning Economist Paul Krugman did with him. I have liked Krugmans articles in the NY Times and blog for a while now. That being said, I am not a liberal and do not agree with Krugman on alot of things, but I appreciate how he breaks down arguments so I can understand where he is coming from.

    If Krugman likes his books they are probably worth checking out.

  7. Oh for the love of…………

    I can’t even go on vacation without missing one of these posts.

    Ooooo, but wait, shiney new camera to play with for vacation, hopefully it will make me forget all about this post.

  8. I already had the book. Good read, although most of the individual stories are terribly pessimistic.

  9. Just wanted to say thanks for posting this – I emailed (apparently fast enough!) and just got a copy in the mail! Yay! Started reading it last night so I can post a review up soon :)

  10. John P. Murphy – I'm an engineer and writer living in New England. My research background is in robotics and computer security; my writing is primarily science fiction and mystery.
    John Murphy

    Did Bill want to be notified when our reviews went up?

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