The Tour Baggage This Time

The Lock In tour lasts for four weeks, but the good news is that Tor arranged the tour so that I come home about once a week for a day or two. Aside from being an awesome thing that will let me save my sanity by allowing me to see my family, and thus not turn into a gibbering, insensate lump two weeks into the tour, it also means that I can pack quite a bit lighter, secure in the knowledge that I will be able to do laundry within a reasonable span of days.

So above, please find my baggage for the first leg of the tour, which takes me to Houston, Austin, Raleigh, Chapel Hill and Decatur, GA. The brown bag consists of clothes for six days (minus tomorrow’s clothes, which I have ready to deploy the instant I wake up), while the computer bag holds a computer (duuuuuhhhh), a tablet, cords, extra battery for tablet and phone, and pens. They’re both very small (the clothes bag is 17×9, and the computer bag is probably 16×4), which means that I will never have to check them or leave them at the side of the plane. This is key when you’re touring; never never never let them separate you from your luggage when you tour because if you do, you will be three cities onward when they finally locate it.

The flip side of this is that I am so tightly packed I have no room for anything else, which is why I warned people in my tour FAQ that if they give me a gift on tour (which does happen, and which is always very sweet), they may see me hand it over to a bookstore staffer or my media escort, who will mail it home for me. I will literally have to leave it in a hotel room otherwise, and nobody wants that. So please don’t be offended if you see me do that.

In any event: Thank you, Tor, for arranging my tour so I can travel light. I actually very much appreciate it.

Comments Are Now Officially (Mostly) Closed Through September 21

As promised. If you missed why, here’s why, and for what entries comments will still be open for.

New Books and ARCs, 8/25/14

Just catching up before I head off on the book tour: Here are latest books and ARCs that have come to the Scalzi Compound. What here can you not live without having in your own library? Share in the comments!

The Doubleclicks Cover “Friday I’m In Love” Because I Asked Them To

And it is adorable.

Also, they let you know about their upcoming tour, which you should go see them on; the song shows up immediately thereafter.

You may recall that I also essayed this song a few months back. The Doubleclicks version is somewhat more musically competent.

On The Matter Of When to Buy Lock In and In What Format

Whenever a new book of mine comes close to a release date, I get emails and social media queries from folks asking me what format they should get the book in and when, in order to give me the most money/exposure/whatever. Which is very sweet. Okay, since you asked, here are some thoughts on the subject.

1. Buy it in whatever format you like, whenever you like. Honestly, you’re the customer. You want it in hardcover? Get it in hardcover. Want it in ebook? Get it in ebook. Want it in audio? Get it in audio. Want to wait until the price goes down? Get it in paperback or in ebook when then paperback comes out. As long as you pay for it, I will also get paid, and in every format I get paid a fair share of the money. The variations of what I get paid in each format are small enough that on an individual level (that’s you), it’s not worth your time to fret about it. So please, buy the book in whatever format pleases you, whenever it pleases you to do so. And thank you.

(Dead broke? Ask for it at your local library, because they buy the book, and I’ll still get paid.)

That said, if you want to be baldly strategic on my behalf about your purchasing and have not already pre-ordered a copy in the format of your choosing and/or feel like picking up another copy to give as a gift/to have for yourself/to use to prop up a wobbly table:

2. Buy the hardcover and buy it in the first week of release. Because that will be useful for the book scaling up the New York Times hardcover best seller list, which remains the gold standard for successful books, and which helps a book get immediate attention. When Redshirts plopped onto the list, I suddenly got lots of interest in the book in the media and in LA, and other opportunities opened up as well. So yes, as a practical matter, having Lock In show up on that list would be groovy for me.

And now, with that said:

3. You should still buy the book in whatever format you like. Because, one, the NYT best seller lists aren’t figured simply by raw sales (the Times uses its own secret sauce of an algorithim to make its calculations which includes sampling from specific bookstores); two, the Times also has ebook and combined print/ebook lists as well, so it all goes into the hopper; three, if I show up on any best seller list, you can be assured Tor and my agents (and I!) will be super-pleased and will promote the fact; four, you’re buying the book for you (or for whomever you’re buying it for, if it’s a gift), not for me. So come on, get it however you want to get it.

And finally, while getting onto the NYT hardcover best seller list would be useful and nice and something that would make it easier to talk about the book to people who have no idea who I am, including some who might adapt it for a screen near you, here’s a fact:

4. There’s more than one way for a book to be successful. Did you know that Old Man’s War has never been anywhere near the NYT best seller lists? Ever? It hasn’t. And yet, to date, it’s my best selling book. That’s because for ten years it’s sold, week in and week out, a solid, consistent number of books that’s nevertheless below the “best seller” threshold. In this case, constant and steady adds up, in sales, in reputation and in terms of being able to make opportunities (other factors, like the Hugo nod it got, helped too).

Nor is OMW the only book about which this can be said — I can reel off lots of classic books, in whatever genre you like, which were never “best sellers” except that they sold for a very long time, keep selling, and have developed reputations from years of readers praising the book to someone else. Meanwhile books that showed up on the official best seller lists one week have dropped off into oblivion the next, never to be seen (or cared about) afterward, the equivalent of one hit wonders on the music charts. There are no guarantees about anything ever.

Which is why I say that you should get the book how you want, when you want to get it. No matter when you get the book, or how you get the book, if you get the book, it’ll make a difference to me, and I will thank you. And while I do appreciate when people want to help me to make any book of mine a success, at the end of the day, what you should be focused on doing, if you are gracious enough to buy a book of mine, is enjoying the book. Leave the rest of it to me and my folks. That’s our job, and we’re pretty good at it so far.

Pre-Tour Procedural Bits

A bit of housekeeping here for folks.

First, as most of you know, tomorrow I will be starting a fairly long book tour, one that ends on September 20 (there are a couple of dates past that, but they don’t require me being out on the road on a more or less constant basis). Here’s what me being on the road will mean in terms of this site and being able to contact me.

1. Comments will (generally) be turned off on Whatever from 5pm (Eastern) tonight until September 21st. I’ve previously explained the reasoning for this here. Comments will be left on for Big Idea posts, and occasional posts for when I have a bit of time to chat. Regular commenting here will resume September 21st.

2. All September Big Idea slots will be assigned by the 8pm (Eastern) tonight. If you have not received a September slot by then, then you may assume the slots are all filled.

3. From tonight at 5pm (Eastern) until September 21st, I will be reading email but NOT responding to most of it. Unless you are my agent, editor, publicist, wife, child or friend I’m trying to schedule a tour meet-up with, for the next four weeks, the chance of me answering your email is pretty slim. This is mostly because I’ll be traveling and being a performing monkey, and will still have to fit business and writing into the times I’m when I’m not doing wither of those two things. So responding to email goes way down.

As noted, I will still be reading the email that is not spam, so if for some reason you feel compelled to send me an e-mail while I’m on tour, go right ahead. Just don’t expect a response. If it is something you want a response for, I’d suggest waiting until September 21st to send it.

My email address will have an auto-responder on it through September 20th, reminding people of the stuff I just mentioned above.

4. While I plan to be writing here on Whatever, for the length of the tour, I’m most likely to be found on Twitter. It’s simply more congenial to the “I am rushing around the country what airport am I in now is this Denver I think it’s Denver honestly I have no idea where I am ” lifestyle I will be living the next few weeks. I have my tweetstream over in the Whatever side bar, and of course, you can follow along on Twitter either by following me or visiting my Twitter page.

That’s the housekeeping for now. If you have questions, drop them into the comments (until, uh, 5pm tonight).