I Can Neither Confirm Nor Deny That I Am A Timeless Goofy Immortal

No comment. NO COMMENT I SAID.

26 thoughts on “I Can Neither Confirm Nor Deny That I Am A Timeless Goofy Immortal

  1. =facepalm= They told you not to muck about with the time machine, but nooooooooooooooooooooo, you wouldn’t listen! Now we have this! The Time Patrol will get you if you keep this up! =D

  2. @ Jack Lint… Those immortals tend to forget that we ephemerals tend to catch on eventually…

  3. You could travel back to take a funny picture, but you couldn’t take the time to attend Stephen Hawking’s time travelers Champagne party?

  4. Leo Slezak was a world renown opera singer and father to Tony award winning actor Walter Slezak who was, in turn, father to actor Erika Slezak winner of 6 Daytime Emmy awards. Not sure about Walter but I’m fairly certain I saw Erika make that same face a few times over the years.

    Can you confirm or deny that you are a morphing timeless goofy immortal?

  5. Drew: He hasn’t traveled back YET! Soon enough he’ll do that and then any trace of my comment and yours will disappear from memory.

  6. First rule of time travel is nobody talks about time travel!

    Second rule of time travel is don’t get photographed!

    You’re time travel license has been suspended until further notice.

  7. Well, the good news is that if this writing thing doesn’t work out, you can always fall back on singing opera as he was a world famous tenor.

  8. Yes, Slezak, past lives really are a thing. And while we are at it, you were once my son and Susan W was your sister.
    “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio…”

  9. “He was a convivial person, and many anecdotes reveal his amiable sense of humour. The best-known example is as follows: during a performance of Wagner’s Lohengrin, a stage hand sent the swan out too early, before the tenor could hop aboard. Seeing his feathered transportation disappear into the wings, Slezak ad-libbed to the audience: “Wann fährt der nächste Schwan?” (“When does the next swan leave?”).”

  10. Slezak was a funny man:

    [D]uring a performance of Wagner’s Lohengrin, a stage hand sent the swan out too early, before the tenor could hop aboard. Seeing his feathered transportation disappear into the wings, Slezak ad-libbed to the audience: “Wann fährt der nächste Schwan?” (“When does the next swan leave?”).

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