The End of a Tree

I mentioned before that the crabapple in front of our house had reached the end of its life this year; today brings the actual end as its (mostly already-dead) body is taken out and a new tree is brought in to take its place. I’m sad to see the crabapple go because for many years it was a lovely tree and a joy to see blossom and thrive; nevertheless its time had come and there was no way to save it. I’ll remember it in its beauty and wish it well in whatever afterlife awaits a good tree. The new tree has a lot to live up to, I’ll say that much.

— JS

12 Comments on “The End of a Tree”

  1. That’s too sad. It always makes me sad when a tree has to go, especially so for a fruit/blossom tree.

    If you have to pull the stump, use a chain, not a rope. A rope becomes a big rubber band that will snap that stump right into your vehicle.

    That new one looks a bit tired too. Hopefully it just needs water.

    Good luck on the planting.

  2. …I’m crying over a tree. I don’t know why, but I am… Maybe it’s the respect and care you give to Nature, that touches me… Regardless, fare thee well, dear Crabapple. Long live the New Guy…

  3. Hope Griffin Diaz – North Carolina – So, to borrow from a popular shirt, I love Jesus but I cuss a little. Well, a lot. In fact, I just don't believe Jesus really gives a shit about the word fuck. He does care if you say f you or go f yourself. But a general adjective? Nah. I am married to the love of my life, Louie (aka Luis) and have an adult child, Christy. My mum, Nancy, is still with us and active in our lives. I love to read, I fancy myself an amateur gardener, I am owned by a large black purr machine maine coon cat named Samwise aka #SamSam and a Border Collie/Australian Cattle dog mix named Daisy. I knit. I craft. I sew. These are at my leisure and are hobbies. I don't take commissions nor do I do alterations. I'm an aspiring human being. I battle several mental illnesses including depression, major panic disorder, agoraphobia, germaphobia, claustrophobia, and some other assorted illnesses. I also have fibromyalgia and have had numerous traumatic brain injuries (into the double digits now). I am not able to drive at night. I don't know where this blog is going ... if anywhere.
    Hope

    Are you replacing it with a fruit bearing tree? We were able to get fruit from our dwarf apple tree this year.

  4. Kate George – Vermont – Award winning author, Kate George is the creator of the popular Bree MacGowan mystery series, which started when she took up a dare to write a book; the result was Moonlighting in Vermont. She was born in Sacramento, California, was raised on a ranch until the age of eight, and graduated from UC Davis with a degree in anthropology. She is currently working on her MFA. She has been, in no particular order, a paste-up tech, a motorcycle safety instructor, an actor, and the assistant to the dean of a medical school, all of which provide plenty of fodder for her novels. Currently, she lives in an old farmhouse in the backwoods of Vermont with her husband, four kids, and two rescue dogs, where by day she teaches and by night, she dreams up wild adventures for her characters. Visit her at kategeorge.com, or contact her at kate@kategeorge.com. She always loves to hear from readers!
    Kate George

    I was hoping someone else would ask this question -I’m dying to know what kind of tree is replacing the crab apple. It kind of looks like it might be a weeping cherry?

  5. Kate George – Vermont – Award winning author, Kate George is the creator of the popular Bree MacGowan mystery series, which started when she took up a dare to write a book; the result was Moonlighting in Vermont. She was born in Sacramento, California, was raised on a ranch until the age of eight, and graduated from UC Davis with a degree in anthropology. She is currently working on her MFA. She has been, in no particular order, a paste-up tech, a motorcycle safety instructor, an actor, and the assistant to the dean of a medical school, all of which provide plenty of fodder for her novels. Currently, she lives in an old farmhouse in the backwoods of Vermont with her husband, four kids, and two rescue dogs, where by day she teaches and by night, she dreams up wild adventures for her characters. Visit her at kategeorge.com, or contact her at kate@kategeorge.com. She always loves to hear from readers!
    Kate George

    Arrrggghhhh, my comment ended up in the void. Or maybe I’m just really impatient. What kind of tree did you replace it with?

  6. You should save the wood and re-use it for adding a bit of sweetness to a fire or for smoking (If you don’t smoke food you could even give it as a gift for a neighbor who smokes (food that is): may be a cheeky way to get a care package in return).

  7. My grandmother was a gardener. Your hole has to be 3 times the cost of the plant. A $10 plant needs a $30 holes.
    How did you get the new tree in the car? And how did it get into the wheel barrow?

  8. Sad. The peak bloom photo shows what a beautiful tree it was.
    Best wishes for your new tree, whatever kind of tree it is.

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